Posts

5 July 2019

We tend to think of most cancers as a single cell line, or clone – one normal cell develops a mutation, and that abnormal cell continues to divide. However, many tumors exhibit what is termed “heterogeneity” – meaning they are composed of cells with different genetic makeups. These cells can have different behaviors, growth patterns and response to treatment.

A study recently published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology looked at the association between tumor heterogeneity and immune cells. They found that tumors with high heterogeneity (more diverse cell population) were associated with worse overall survival. They also found that these tumors were associated with lower levels of anti-tumor T-cells (an immune system cell) and “immune checkpoint molecules”, and had a higher percentage of immunosuppressive T-cells. Their finding was noted primarily in estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers.

Testing for different cell populations within a tumor is not routinely performed at this point in time. In addition, the authors noted that it is up for debate (and further research) which comes first – do the diverse tumor cell populations attract immune cells, or do the immune cells act to control tumor cell diversity. They noted that additional work is needed to better understand the changes that influence tumor cell heterogeneity and to develop methods to prevent it from occurring. This is just one of the reasons why a “cure” for cancer is not that simple. Cancer – even a single tumor in one patient – is not just one disease.

30 January 2019

The buzz this morning came from a group of scientists in Israel, claiming that they have developed a cure for cancer – one that will work on ALL cancers – and it will be ready for patient care within a year. Amazing!!

But not so fast. The report, which first appeared in the Jerusalem Post, and then was picked up by multiple news outlets, described research that has only been carried out in mice. The article quotes the researchers: “the company has concluded its first exploratory mice experiment…” and then goes on to state: “Our results are consistent and repeatable.” The article read as a press release, and there was no link to any published research.

I am not a basic science researcher, so for a deep dive on the science please review Dr. David Gorski’s post. An important point that he highlighted – the research findings have not been published a peer-reviewed journal. Dr. Matthew Hall, who is the biology group leader for the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the NIH, posted this thread on his twitter feed:


Dr. Hillary Stires, a breast cancer researcher at Georgetown, noted:

Many new drugs are first tested in mice. Dr. Susan Love notes that mice do not naturally develop breast cancer. Researchers inject tumor cells into the mice in order to then study the responses to treatment. Just because it works in a mouse does not mean it will work in a person!

 

We all want a cure for cancer. Yes – even the surgeons, oncologists and researchers. We will find something else to do if this disease is cured. But cancer is not one disease and the concept of “The Cure” that will work for all cancers is probably not realistic. Articles such as this, and the avalanche of coverage that followed, only raise false hope among patients and their loved ones.

The Modern Tragedy of Fake Cancer Cures
Scientists Say They’ll Have a Cure for Cancer Within a Year
American Cancer Society / Dr. Lichtenfeld Blog
If It Sounds Too Good To Be True… 

8 November 2012

I had the honor to collaborate on this ASCO Connection post with Dr. Don S. Dizon, a medical oncologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital specializing in women’s cancers.  This post grew out of twitter and email conversations  – we were discussing cancer prevention, risk reduction, and cure – and how our conversations and thoughts have changed due in part from our interactions with patients in the  BCSM Community and other social media sites.

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