4 December 2020

The actress Shannen Doherty revealed today that she has Stage 4 breast cancer. From media reports, it appears that she was initially diagnosed and treated in 2015 and developed a recurrence within the past year.

“Recurrence” simply means that the cancer has come back. Breast cancer can recur in the breast or chest area, which is called a local recurrence. This is usually treated with surgery to remove the recurrent tumor, most commonly mastectomy if lumpectomy was the original operation. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormonal therapy may also be recommended. The risk of local recurrence after lumpectomy is generally less than 10% and less than 5% after mastectomy.

Breast cancer cells can travel from the breast to the lymph nodes or through the blood stream and then deposit in other organs. This is termed systemic recurrence, metastatic breast cancer, or stage 4 breast cancer. The lungs, liver, bones and brain are the most common sites for metastatic breast cancer. Metastatic breast cancer is not curable, and patients who develop metastatic disease will require lifelong treatment.

Anyone who has been treated for breast cancer can develop metastatic disease. It is estimated that as many as 30% of patients will eventually develop metastatic disease but it difficult to get exact numbers because recurrences are not tracked like initial diagnoses are. The likelihood of developing metastatic disease is higher in patients who are diagnosed at more advanced stages and in those with more aggressive tumor biology / behavior, but even the less aggressive or slower growing tumors have the potential to spread. 

Since the most common sites of spread are the lungs, liver, bones and brain, attention should be paid to changes such as persistent cough or shortness of breath, abdominal pain, increased abdomen size, jaundice (yellowing of the eyes), persistent bone pain, fractures with no history of trauma, severe headaches, and new onset seizure. However, patients may have metastatic disease without any symptoms. While there is no true prevention, endocrine therapy (for those with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer) can reduce risk. A healthy diet, regular exercise, and weight control can also reduce risk. It is of course possible to do “everything right” and still develop metastatic cancer.

As mentioned, treatment for stage 4 breast cancer is lifelong. There have been many advances in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer – chemotherapy is not always required and newer targeted therapies have been developed. This is an area of active research. However, approximately 40,000 women and 500 men will die each year in the US due to metastatic breast cancer. More work is needed to better understand why some patients develop metastatic breast cancer, how to prevent breast cancer from spreading, and how best to treat it once it does spread.

Metastatic breast cancer information from cancer.net
Metastatic Breast Cancer Network
Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance
Metavivor
MetUp

25 December 2019

Two studies recently presented at the recent San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium focused on a subtype of breast cancer known as Her2/neu over-expressed, which include up to 20% of breast cancers. In these tumors, the gene that codes for the Her2 protein receptor has more than the usual number of copies. These tumors tend to have more aggressive growth patterns and up until the development of targeted antibody therapy, prognosis was very poor. 

Targeted antibody therapy including trastuzumab (Herceptin) and pertuzumab (Perjeta) is now standard of care for Her2 breast cancers, even in the setting of early-stage disease. Trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla, T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC, a combination of the antibody and a chemotherapy agent) and is most commonly used in patients with metastatic disease. Unfortunately, not all Her2 tumors respond to therapy, and some tumors that initially respond can mutate and become resistant to therapy. Brain metastases can occur in up to 50% of patients with metastatic Her2 breast cancer, and can be challenging to treat as medications may not be able to pass through the blood-brain barrier to get to the cancer cells. 

Trastuzumab deruxtecan (DS-8201, Enhertu) is an ADC and results of a phase 2 study (DESTINY-Breast01*) were presented. This study included 184 patients with metastatic Her2 breast cancer, who were experiencing disease progression after receiving 2 or more different anti-Her2 treatment protocols (including trastuzumab emtansine, median 6 prior therapies, range 2-27). This was an “open label” study and patients were not randomized. Median follow up was 11 months and findings included:

  • Median treatment duration was 10 months
  • Overall response rate was 60.3% (at least 2 follow up scans, 6 weeks apart)
  • 11 patients (6%) experienced a complete response (apparent resolution of disease)
  • 101 patients (55%) experienced a partial response
  • Median duration of response to treatment was 14.8 months
  • In patients with brain metastases (24 patients), median progression-free survival (PFS, time to disease advancement) was 18 months
  • Adverse events (AE) occurred in all but one patient. The most common AE were nausea, hair loss, vomiting, constipation and neutropenia (low white blood cell count) 
  • 57% of patients experienced more serious (≥ grade 3) AE
  • 28.8% of patients stopped treatment due to disease progression
  • 15.2% of patients stopped treatment due to AE
  • One of the more serious complications, interstitial lung disease (ILD), was reported in 25 patients and 4 patients died due to ILD-related causes

Shortly after the study was presented, the drug received accelerated FDA approval for patients with unresectable (not able to be removed with surgery) or metastatic Her2 breast cancer who have experienced disease progression after treatment with 2 or more targeted agents. The approval is accompanied by a warning due to risks of ILD as well as embryo-fetal toxicity. 

ASCO Post coverage of trastuzumab deruxtecan

The other study involved Tucatinib, which is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, administered in pill form. The Her2CLIMB trial* was a Phase 3 study that included patients with Her2 metastatic breast cancer who previously received treatment with trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and trastuzumab emtansine. Patients with and without brain metastases, including untreated brain metastases, were included. Patients in this trial received either tucatinib or placebo, in combination with trastuzumab and capecitabine (Xeloda – an oral form of chemotherapy).

The study included 612 patients. 410 received tucatinib-trastuzumab-capecitabine (T-C) and 202 received placebo-trastuzumab-capecitabine (P-C). 48% of patients in the T-C group and 46% of patients in the P-C group had brain metastases at enrollment. Median follow up was 14 months and findings included:

  • At one year, PFS was 33% in the T-C group and 12% in the P-C group
  • At one year, median duration of PFS was 7.8 months in the patients who received T-C and 5.6 months in the patients who received P-C
  • Overall survival (OS) at 2 years was 45% in the patients receiving T-C and 27% in those who received P-C
  • Median OS was 21.9 months in the patients receiving T-C and 17.4 moths in the patients who received P-C
  • Among patients with brain metastases, estimated PFS at one year was 24.9% in the T-C group and 0% in the P-C group
  • Among patients with brain metastases, median duration of PFS was 7.6 months in the T-C group and 5.4 months in the P-C group
  • The most common adverse effects in the patients in the T-C group were diarrhea, hand-foot syndrome, nausea, fatigue, and vomiting
  • 23 (5.7%) patients in the T-C arm and 6 (3.0%) patients in the P-C arm discontinued therapy due to side effects
  • Of the 215 deaths that occurred during the study, the most common reason was disease progression. Adverse events were the cause of death in 6 (1.5%) of patients in the T-C group and 5 (2.5%) in the P-C group

ASCO Post coverage of tucatinib

While these 2 studies demonstrate the progress that has been made in treating an aggressive form of breast cancer, they also serve as a sobering reminder of the work that remains. The hope with targeted therapy is that cancer cells will be killed with minimal toxicity to other cells or the person – we are not quite there yet. In addition, while the improvements in progression free and overall survival is encouraging, we are not yet able to ensure long-term survival for patients with metastatic Her2 breast cancer. If you donate to breast cancer research organizations, please consider this when deciding which groups to support.

*If you are not able to access the full studies and would like a copy, please email me: contact at drattai dot com

13 November 2019

The UCLA Center for Health Policy Research (UCLA CHPR) is developing a report on metastatic breast cancer, with the goal to drive actionable change in policy and practice. On Monday November 18th, the community will be asked to provide their thoughts for the UCLA CHPR team as part of their research study. The goal is to hear from patients, healthcare providers, researchers, caregivers, and advocates about the different types of barriers and challenges that patients with metastatic breast cancer may encounter when seeking and undergoing treatment. 

No idea too small or idealistic – we want creative, actionable solutions! The information gathered in this research study will be shared more broadly with other stakeholders, advocates, and policy makers. Please add your voice to this important conversation! This study has been funded by the California Breast Cancer Research Program

The study team may be contacted by sending an email to: ajscheitler@ucla.edu

If you’ve never joined a tweet chat, click here for information on how to participate in the conversation.

Discussion topics will include: 

  1. What are the most significant healthcare communication barriers faced by patients with metastatic breast cancer? 
  2. What are the most significant barriers to obtaining appropriate palliative care faced by patients with metastatic breast cancer?
  3. What are the most significant financial barriers faced by patients with metastatic breast cancer?
  4. What are the most significant barriers to obtaining disability faced by patients with metastatic breast cancer? 
  5. What health system or policy actions do you recommend to address barriers these barriers to care?
  6. Any other comments or suggestions! 

16 September 2019

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a safety announcement about a “rare but severe” lung inflammation that can result from the use of any of 3 breast cancer medications – palbocilcilb (Ibrance), ribociclib (Kisqali), and abemaciclib (Verzenio). These 3 medications are in a class of drugs called cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors. They are used in estrogen receptor positive (ER+), Her2/neu negative metastatic (Stage 4) breast cancer, and work by interfering with cell division

The FDA announcement states that “the overall benefit of CDK 4/6 inhibitors is still greater than the risks when used as prescribed.” Palbociclib has been FDA-approved since 2015, and ribociclib and abemaciclib hae been approved since 2017. In evaluating studies of all 3 of the CDK 4/6 inhibitors, the FDA alert noted that 1-3% of patients taking these medications developed severe lung inflammation, and less than 1% died due to the condition.

The FDA recommended that patients notify their physicians immediately if they develop difficulty or discomfort with breathing or shortness of breath while at rest or at low activity when taking any of these medications. The FDA alert notes that there no specific risk factors that have been identified to determine how likely an individual patient is to develop severe lung inflammation while taking one of the CDK 4/6 inhibitors. They recommended that physicians routinely monitor their patients for lung symptoms that could indicate the development of severe inflammation. They also recommended that any side effects be reported to the FDA MedWatch Program. The alert noted that common side effects include “nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, decreased appetite, abdominal pain, infections, low red blood cell counts, low white blood cell counts, low platelet count, headache, dizziness, hair thinning or loss, rash, tiredness, and weakness”. I will post an update as more information becomes available.

Additional Information:

4 June 2019

Encouraging news for patients with metastatic estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), Her2/neu negative breast cancer was presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The MONALEESA-7 Phase III trial evaluated the use of ribociclib in combination with endocrine therapy. Patients who received ribociclib and endocrine therapy were found to have improved overall survival rates compared to those who received endocrine therapy alone. Prior studies demonstrated improved progression free survival, but this was the first demonstration of an improvement in overall survival. Patients enrolled in this study were pre- or peri-menopausal.

Ribociclib is an oral medication belonging to the CDK 4/6 inhibitor class of targeted agents. The CDK 4/6 pathway is important for cell division. CDK 4/6 inhibitors block progression through the normal cell cycle, so cancer cells are “arrested” in a resting phase and cannot divide. This study found that at 42 months, patients treated with ribociclib had a 70% overall survival rate, compared to 46% for the patients who received endocrine therapy alone. In absolute numbers, there were 26 fewer deaths (83 or 337 versus 109 of 335) in the treatment group. Because patients who develop metastatic breast cancer after a diagnosis of early-stage disease are not re-staged, it is not possible to determine with certainty how many patients this medication may be appropriate for. Approximately 40,000 women and 500 men die from metastatic breast cancer every year. ER+ is the most common breast cancer subtype.

Prior studies have evaluated a similar drug, palbociclib, which has been approved for use in women and men with metastatic breast cancer. There are ongoing studies evaluating all 3 of the “ciclib” agents to get a better sense of whether the results will be similar across all patient populations or if a particular drug will be better for a particular subset of patients. All 3 agents are oral (pills). While side effects may be an issue for some patients, these medications are much better tolerated compared to traditional chemotherapy. Unfortunately, cost and insurance coverage may be an issue in some situations.

In addition, I do think that it is important to point out that in the current study, the majority of patients (67% in the ribociclib arm and 73% in the endocrine therapy alone arm) went on to receive other therapy – meaning that the disease progressed. We are still a long way from a “cure” despite improvements in overall survival, and we’re a long way from single-agent therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Patients with metastatic breast cancer are still expected to need more than one, and in some cases multiple, agents over time as the cancer finds ways to mutate and continue to grow. The findings of this study are a step in the right direction, but much more research is needed.

Additional Information:
ASCO Post – 2019 ASCO: MONALEESA 7
NBC News – Breast Cancer Treatment Shows Hope for Younger Women

13 May 2019

Note – the survey closed on July 7th 2019. Thank you to all who participated and shared, and we will be sure to post the results when they are available!

Approximately 25-30% of patients with breast cancer who are prescribed endocrine therapy do not complete the full course of treatment, and some patients never start. Side effects of endocrine therapy are well documented but there is very little literature on the role of the medical team in helping patients manage treatment-related side effects. 

This survey is being conducted for research purposes. It is a UCLA research survey, open to women and men with a history of breast cancer who have been treated with or who have received a recommendation for endocrine therapy. 

This survey is voluntary and is completely anonymous – no identifying information, including internet protocol (IP) addresses, will be collected. The survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete. We value your time and your opinions. 

For questions regarding this study, you may contact principal investigator Dr. Deanna Attai By phone: (818) 333-2555; by email: dattai@mednet.ucla.edu; or by mail: 191 S. Buena Vista #415, Burbank, CA 91505

UCLA Office of the Human Research Protection Program (OHRPP):
If you have questions about your rights as a research subject, or if you have concerns or suggestions and you want to talk to someone other than the researchers, you may contact the UCLA OHRPP  By phone: (310) 206-2040; by email: participants@research.ucla.edu; or by mail: Box 951406, Los Angeles, CA  90095-1406

Research Survey Link

15 April 2018

Press coverage of a study recently published in the journal Science Translational Medicine has raised a lot of eyebrows and may be causing unnecessary worry in patients. The headline in USA Today noted “Healing process after breast cancer surgery may trigger cancer to spread, study says.”

Not mentioned in the headline: the study was performed in mice. Mice were injected with breast cancer cells, developed tumors, and then underwent a surgical procedure to implant a small sponge, I presume similar to the surgical gauze that is used in the operating room. Note – the mice did not have traditional breast cancer surgery. The study found that the mice that underwent the surgical procedure had a higher rate of developing metastatic breast cancer – spread to other organs of the body. They also found that when mice received anti-inflammatory agents (meloxicam – brand name Mobic – was used in the study), they had a lower rate of developing metastatic disease.

It is well known that surgery can cause an inflammatory response and alteration in immune system function.. It is not entirely clear what that means for the average patient undergoing breast cancer surgery, and we certainly do not see metastatic disease develop in the majority of patients treated with surgery. If inadvertently left behind in a surgical wound (a very rare event), surgical gauze causes significant swelling, pain, inflammation and often infection – not at all similar to the healing process from lumpectomy or mastectomy. We cannot make assumptions from this mouse study if the use of anti-inflammatory agents after surgery would be helpful in human patients.

The take-home point for me is from my quote in the Stat News coverage: “I do not know if this mimics the potential effect of a lumpectomy or mastectomy, but the inflammatory response to an implanted foreign body would be expected to be quite robust,” said UCLA’s Dr. Deanna Attai, a past president of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. That inflammation, not surgery, might be awakening dormant cancer cells. Nevertheless, she said, “this study and the handful of others like it certainly are interesting and warrant further study.”

Until we have more information, and studies in humans with breast cancer, breast cancer surgery remains an important component of treatment.

Health News Review coverage: A breast cancer study in mice gets big headlines, setting up potential for patient “disaster”, experts say

9 November 2017

In patients with a common form of breast cancer, known as estrogen receptor (ER) “positive”, endocrine therapy is often recommended after other treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation are complete. Tamoxifen, most commonly used in pre-menopausal women, blocks the estrogen receptor on the breast cell, so estrogen cannot impact cell growth. In post-menopausal women, aromatase inhibitors (AI) are commonly used – these medications block the production of estrogen in the fat cells – a primary source of estrogen after menopause. Historically, these medications have been used for 5 years after completion of other treatment, although there are some studies suggesting longer courses may benefit certain patients. However, longer courses of therapy are associated with a higher incidence of side effects.

A study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrated that after 5 years of endocrine therapy, patients have an increasing risk of breast cancer recurrence with long term follow up. The authors evaluated individual patient data from a large database of randomized trials. They found that in patients with stage I tumors (tumor less than 2 centimeters and no lymph node involvement) the 20 year risk of recurrence was approximately 13%. In patients with 4-9 involved nodes, the risk ranged from 34-41% depending on the size of the main tumor.

This study is important as it confirms what many of us see in our practices – that breast cancer can and does recur, even many years after therapy. However, it also raises an important discussion point about our treatments. Studies have estimated that as many as 30% of women prescribed endocrine therapy stop treatment due to side effects which significantly interfere with quality of life such as menopausal symptoms, bone and joint pains, bone loss (osteoporosis) and fracture, and mental status changes (“chemobrain”). Patients should discuss any of these symptoms, especially if they are considering stopping their medication, with their physicians. Lifestyle changes, exercise programs, and medications may be of benefit. It is also important to understand that despite all appropriate treatment, cancer can and does come back – so health maintenance and surveillance are important even long after cancer therapy has ended.

8 May 2017

As a past-president of the American Society of Breast Surgeons I am probably more than a little biased. However, as always, the annual meeting held April 26-30th in Las Vegas was terrific. Topics including the full spectrum of breast disease, including benign and high risk lesions, genetic testing, breast cancer diagnosis and treatment including medical and radiation oncology updates, and metastatic disease.

The press briefing highlighted 3 abstracts which showed that:

  • Modern therapy for inflammatory breast cancer is associated with better outcomes than historically seen
  • Post-treatment lymphedema is related to a combination of treatments including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy – not just from surgery
  • Patients with DCIS have a 5 year risk of developing a cancer in the other breast of 2.8% and a 10 year risk of 5.6%, and patients should be discouraged from undergoing bilateral mastectomy for this condition. Developing a new cancer in the previously treated breast was twice as likely as developing a new cancer in the opposite breast, and the use of tamoxifen reduced the likelihood of any recurrence.

Dr. Nathalie Johnson moderated a pre-meeting course on Building a Breast Cancer Survivorship Program. I was invited to speak on Traditional Versus Virtual – Options for Patient Support and Education. Just as it can be challenging to choose between cake and ice cream (2 really good things), patients note advantages to both in person and online support and education. It doesn’t have to be one or the other – do what works for YOU! My slides are posted on SlideShare.

During the general sessions, a few topics stood out to me:

Dr. Shelley Hwang from Duke University spoke on DCIS subtyping and overtreatment. She noted that DCIS now comprises over 20% of all mammographically detected breast cancer. It is considered a “non-obligate precursor” of invasive cancer – the rate and likelihood of progression to invasive cancer are not clearly known. However, it is clear that some patients will never exhibit progression to invasive disease, and she discussed this in the context of thyroid and prostate cancer – two situations where we know that treatment in some patients will not provide the patient any benefit. The challenge is to sort out which patients will benefit from treatment and which ones will not. The COMET study is currently enrolling patients with low grade DCIS to in an attempt to help answer these questions.

Dr. Virginia Herrmann from Washington University in St. Louis spoke on non-genetic breast cancer risk factors. This is an important topic and I believe one that doesn’t get covered enough. She noted that hormone replacement therapy does increase risk – although the incremental risk is small and is seen only after about 5 years of use. However, longer term use does result in higher risk. Increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with risk – the risk of breast cancer is 30% higher in patients with a BMI greater than 31 kg/m2 compared to a BMI of 20 kg/m2. She noted that there is a linear relationship between alcohol intake and cancer risk, noting a 10% increase in risk for each 10 gm/day (for wine this is a little over 3 oz) increment in alcohol consumption. The risk is most associated with post-menopausal breast cancer, although in the study she quoted, only alcohol intake during age 50s was associated with an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. She noted the association of ionizing radiation and breast cancer, and young women who received mantle (chest area) radiation for Hodgkin’s lymphoma have a markedly increased risk for developing breast cancer. She noted that breast cancer risk is increased in smokers, correlated with smoking intensity and duration. Finally, she noted the increased risk of breast cancer among soldiers stationed at Camp LeJune related to contaminated drinking water (tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene).

Dr. Tiffany Traina, a Memorial Sloan Kettering medical oncologist, gave a brief presentation about triple negative breast cancer: Searching For the Magic Bullet. There are several promising treatment strategies including targeting androgen receptors, the use of PARP-inhibitors in patients who have BRCA gene mutations, antibody-drug conjugates, immune modulating approaches, and targeted therapies based on tumor genomic profiles. Stay tuned – much more to come over the next few years related to this aggressive breast cancer subtype.

Dr. Lisa Newman, from the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, spoke on Breast Cancer Outcomes: Disparities versus Biology. I have heard her speak on this topic multiple times over the years and always enjoy her excellent presentations. She noted that the incidence of breast cancer in black women is increasing, now close to that in white women. However, mortality rates for black women are higher than those for white women. There is an increased frequency of triple negative breast cancer in black women. She is involved in a research initiative evaluating the association between African ancestry and high risk breast cancer in white American women, African American women, and women in Ghana, including studying novel aspects of tumor biology and breast cancer stem cells – she is asking the question “are there differences in the oncogenic potential of mammary tissue that are associated with ancestry”? She concluded with what I felt was a powerful slide – 60% – 43% – 20%. Those were the survival rates for passengers on the Titanic who were in 1st – 2nd – 3rd class. She noted that healthcare outcomes are often dependent on access to care, and ended with a quote from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: “Of all the forms of injustice, inequality in health care is the most shocking and inhumane”.

Dr. Stephen Edge, from the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, gave an update on the new American Joint Commission on Cancer staging system (AJCC 8th edition). Currently we stage breast cancer based on tumor size and lymph node status. However, it is recognized that that tumor biology plays an important role in prognosis and in some patients it may be more important that tumor size. The new staging system will incorporate tumor grade, Her2/neu status, ER/PR status, and Oncotype Dx status (if available) and should more accurately reflect prognosis. There are 422 lines in the new staging system – it will be impossible to memorize! Thankfully, he noted that the AJCC is working on a staging app.

The last day of the meeting held some great sessions, and the meeting room remained packed up until the very last minute. Dr. Ann Partridge from Dana Farber discussed special considerations in the young breast cancer patient. She noted that the disease is different, the patients are different, and the treatments should be different. Younger women have a higher likelihood to have more aggressive subtypes such as Her2/neu over-expressed and triple negative, and have lower survival rates than older women – even in those with the ER positive breast cancer. However, she cautioned not to over-treat patients based only on age. She noted that young age is not a contraindication for breast conservation, and that there is no clear improvement in mortality in patients who undergo more extensive surgery. She noted the need for improvements in treatment and support, including focused research and guidelines, which should lead to better outcomes.

Dr. Irene Wapnir from Stanford spoke on fertility preservation issues. She noted the various fertility options including medications and procedures. She also reviewed the POSITIVE trial, which will be assessing the risk of breast cancer relapse in patients who temporarily stop endocrine therapy to permit pregnancy, as well as to evaluate factors associated with successful pregnancy after interruption of endocrine therapy. She also stressed that fertility preservation should be discussed with any woman of childbearing age, whether or not she has had a prior pregnancy or a child – physicians won’t know what is important to their patients unless we ask!

Dr. Katherina Zabicki Calvillo from Dana Farber discussed breast cancer in pregnancy. She noted that 0.2-4.0% of breast cancers are diagnosed in pregnant patients – about 1 in 3000 pregnancies. She also noted that given the overall delay in childbearing (and the association of increasing age with breast cancer), the incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer will increase. Delays in diagnosis are related to hormonal changes which affect breast tissue making the exam more challenging, and that many patients and physicians assume that masses are related to pregnancy. She stressed that pregnancy termination is usually NOT required, but a multidisciplinary team approach is required. Many of these patients present in more advanced stages, but stage-for-stage, the prognosis is similar to non-pregnant patients with breast cancer. Chemotherapy can be given after the first trimester, but hormonal and Her2/neu targeted therapy should be avoided. She noted that mastectomy should be performed in the first and early 2nd trimester, and discussed the challenges of immediate reconstruction. Breast conservation could be considered in the late 2nd or 3rd trimester with post-lumpectomy radiation planned for after delivery.

Dr. Kevin Hughes from the Massachusetts General Hospital reviewed research studies that have found that in women over the age of 70 with early stage breast cancer, radiation therapy after lumpectomy may not be necessary.  The CALGB 9343 study showed that survival rates were the same whether women received radiation therapy or not. Radiation therapy did reduce the likelihood of cancer returning in the breast (local recurrence) from about 4% in the untreated patients to about 1% in the treated patients (after 5 years of follow up). However it is important to realize that the majority of women in that study were treated with endocrine therapy, which can help reduce the risk of local recurrence. As with many decisions regarding breast cancer treatment, a careful discussion of the risks and benefits of each option is necessary.

Dr. Tina Hieken from the Mayo Clinic gave a very interesting talk on the microbiome and the impact on breast cancer. We normally co-exist with many bacteria – we have ten times the more microbial cells compared to human cells. These microbes carry out metabolic reactions that can be essential to human health. The genetic material (genome) of our microorganisms is called the microbiome. She and her colleagues studied breast tissue from women with and without breast cancer and found that the background breast microbiome is different in women with breast cancer compared to those with benign conditions. She concluded by noting that the future may involve using a microbial pattern to predict breast cancer risk, exploiting the microbiome to enhance treatment response, and that there may also be implications for a cancer prevention vaccine. The Washington Post recently covered her research – definitely worth a read for more information.

Dr. Anthony Lucci from MD Anderson discussed the “Ongoing Saga of Circulating Tumor Cells”. We would all like to see the day when a blood test can tell us with certainty if cancer has developed or returned – but we’re not there yet. After reviewing several studies evaluating both circulating tumor cells (CTC) and circulating “cell free” DNA, he concluded that this information does provide prognostic information in both metastatic and non-metastatic patients, but is not in the current ASCO or NCCN guidelines for guiding treatment. Combining the CTC status with response to preoperative chemotherapy may identify a low risk subset of patients, but noted that additional studies are needed before we can reach the ultimate goal which is improving outcomes by monitoring and responding to CTC and cell free DNA levels.

Dr. Manjeet Chadha from Mount Sinai spoke on repeat lumpectomy after prior lumpectomy and breast radiation. Traditionally, mastectomy has been recommended if cancer returns after lumpectomy and radiation therapy. On average, there is about a 10% risk of “in breast” recurrence after lumpectomy and radiation, but this will vary based on tumor and treatment type. She reviewed several studies evaluating the different types of focused or partial breast radiation that may be used in selected patients who experience recurrence of their breast cancer. She also called for additional studies in this area.

One of the last talks was by Dr. Mehra Golshan from Dana Farber. He spoke about the decision whether or not to operate on patients with breast cancer who present with Stage IV (metastatic) disease. Traditionally, we have not recommended surgery for patients with metastatic breast cancer as these patients were not expected to have long survival, and it was not felt that removal of the main tumor would impact survival. Evaluating existing studies has also been challenging because while some have shown a benefit to removal of the main tumor, the patients who underwent surgery in those studies tended to be younger and healthier. He concluded by noting that surgery in patients with Stage IV breast cancer is not standard of care, but some studies do support this practice. It is recommended that these patients be evaluated in a multidisciplinary forum and that treatment choices be individualized.

 I returned from the meeting exhausted but energized. In addition to the scientific content, the meeting is an opportunity to connect with friends and colleagues across the country. I’m already looking forward to ASBrS 2018!

This post has not been endorsed by the American Society of Breast Surgeons.

13 October 2016

The 13th of October is designated for metastatic breast cancer awareness. Metastatic, or Stage IV breast cancer, is when the cancer has spread outside of the breast or underarm lymph nodes. The most common sites of spread are the bones, liver, lung and brain.  Later stage of disease at the time of diagnosis is a risk factor, as is aggressive tumor biology. However, anyone who has been treated for breast cancer has the potential to develop metastatic disease. Metastatic disease can develop at any point after treatment – even many (15-20) years later. Approximately 6% of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, known as “de novo” metastatic disease.

The overwhelming majority of the roughly 40,000 women and 500 men who die from breast cancer every year in the United States die from metastatic breast cancer. Patients who develop metastatic disease are on some form of treatment (chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, targeted agents, or a combination of medications) for life. Radiation therapy and surgery may also be used as part of treatment. In patients with metastatic disease, the focus shifts from potential cure of cancer to controlling areas of cancer growth and managing side effects related to treatment and disease progression. Treatments have improved considerably and many women and men with metastatic breast cancer are living longer than ever, but there is no cure.

During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and all year, it is important to remember that early detection does not prevent spread. More aggressive surgery does not prevent spread. Metastatic cancer cells may be present before the tumor in the breast is even detected. Take a few minutes to become educated about the breast cancer that kills, and consider supporting research that is trying to find answers.

For more information:

10/13/2019 NPR Interview
Metastatic breast cancer information from cancer.net
Metastatic Breast Cancer Network
Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance
Metavivor
MetUp

Updated 13 October 2019